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USDA International Meat Review


23 July 2012

USDA International Meat Review - 19th July 2012USDA International Meat Review - 19th July 2012

Recently, the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) published U.S. red meat export and import data for May 2012. According to the figures, during May, U.S. exports of beef and veal cuts and beef variety meats totaled 95,219 MT.
USDA International Meat Review

Trade Highlights

This was slightly higher than the previous month but was 13.3 percent lower than May 2011. More specifically, exports of fresh, chilled beef equaled 30,238 MT, which was down 2.3 percent from the previous month and was down 17.7 percent from May 2011. Exports of frozen beef equaled 35,035 MT, which was down slightly from the previous month and was down 7.7 percent from May 2011. U.S. beef variety meat exports during May rose 4.6 percent over the previous month to 26,520 MT. However, this was 15.3 percent less than May 2011. Year-to-date beef variety meat exports totaled 133,045 MT, 10.1 percent less than last year. During May, U.S. beef exports to Mexico fell 5.7 percent from April to 15,852 MT. Total year-to-date beef exports to Mexico were 14.9 percent below a year ago, amounting to 88,385 MT. Mexico was the main U.S. beef export market with 19.4 percent of the total. During May, the U.S. exported 13,870 MT of beef to Canada, which was 2.3 percent higher than the previous month. Year-to-date beef exports to Canada totaled 64,259 MT, 7.2 percent lower than last year. Beef exports to South Korea during May fell 19.1 percent from the previous month to 11,007 MT. Total year-to-date beef exports to South Korea were 23.7 percent less than last year, amounting to 58,142 MT. Overall, U.S. total year-todate beef and veal and beef variety meat exports equaled 456,345 MT, which was 10.4 percent below the corresponding period a year ago.

U.S. exports of pork cuts and pork variety meats during May totaled 183,858 MT. This was 2.0 percent higher than the previous month and was 2.8 percent higher than May 2011. Specifically, fresh, chilled pork exports totaled 58,910 MT, which was up 11.6 percent over the previous month and was up 28.2 percent over May 2011. Frozen pork exports totaled 76,936 MT, which was down 10.2 percent from the previous month but was up 6.9 percent over May 2011. During May, U.S. pork variety meat exports rose 10.5 percent over the previous month to 33,623 MT. However, this was down 15.8 percent from May 2011. Total year-to-date pork variety meat exports were 13.3 percent below a year ago, amounting to 172,919 MT. During May, the U.S. exported 45,868 MT of pork to Mexico, which was up 6.3 percent over the previous month. Total year-to-date pork exports to Mexico equaled 247,893 MT, which was 15.3 percent greater than last year. Mexico was the largest U.S. pork export market with 26.0 percent of the total. Pork exports to Japan during May fell 4.9 percent from the previous month to 37,116 MT. Year-to-date pork exports to Japan were 5.2 percent less than last year, amounting to 199,026 MT. During May, the U.S. exported 31,328 MT of pork to China. This was 3.7 percent higher than the previous month. Year-to-date pork exports to China reached 149,103 MT, 60.3 percent greater than a year ago. Overall, U.S. total year-to-date exports of pork cuts and pork variety meats equaled 953,505 MT, 5.6 percent more than the same period a year ago.

During May, U.S. beef and veal imports totaled 81,157 MT. This was up 14.1 percent over April and was up 22.3 percent over May 2011. Specifically, imports of fresh, chilled beef equaled 28,372 MT, which was 10.6 percent higher than the previous month but was slightly lower than May 2011. Imports of frozen beef equaled 50,564 MT, which was 18.6 percent higher than the previous month and was 41.5 percent higher than May 2011. During May, the U.S. imported 26,532 MT of beef from Australia, which was 15.4 percent more than the previous month. Total year-to-date beef imports from Australia equaled 97,904 MT, 85.2 percent above a year ago. This placed Australia as the leading beef import market for the U.S. with 28.2 percent of the total, overtaking Canada. U.S. beef imports from Canada during May rose 1.3 percent over the previous month to 18,238 MT. Year-to-date beef imports from Canada totaled 96,376 MT, which was 2.4 percent higher than last year. During May, the U.S. imported 20,007 MT of beef from New Zealand, which was up 20.4 percent over the previous month. Total year-to-date beef imports from New Zealand were 1.4 percent higher than last year, amounting to 79,561 MT. Year-to-date beef imports from Uruguay reached 10,003 MT, which was 54.0 percent more than a year ago. Overall, U.S. total year-to-date beef and veal imports equaled 347,214 MT, which was 22.1 percent above the corresponding period a year ago.

U.S. pork imports during May fell 2.5 percent from the previous month and 3.5 percent from May 2011 to 26,796 MT. More specifically, fresh, chilled pork imports totaled 16,215 MT, which was up 8.3 percent over the previous month but was down 1.7 percent from May 2011. Frozen pork imports totaled 7,102 MT, which was down 17.4 percent from the previous month but was up 6.7 percent over May 2011. Pork imports from Canada during May rose 7.8 percent over the previous month to 21,633 MT. Year-to-date pork imports from Canada totaled 114,341 MT, which was nearly unchanged from a year ago. Canada was the main supplier of pork to the U.S. with 79.6 percent of the total. During May, pork imports from Denmark fell 44.0 percent from the previous month to 2,127 MT. Total year-to-date pork imports from Denmark were 8.5 percent less than last year, amounting to 13,944 MT. Overall, U.S. total yearto- date pork imports equaled 143,590 MT, a little more than the same period a year ago. To obtain additional U.S. trade data, visit the FAS website http://www.fas.usda.gov/gats/.

North America

According to recent data from the USDA Livestock and Grain Markets News (LGMN), through the first half of 2012, the U.S. imported 902,995 head of feeder cattle from Mexico. This was 29.0 percent greater than the same time frame in 2011 and was 55.7 percent greater than 2010. The significant increase is due to extending drought conditions in Mexico, forcing many producers to liquidate herds. According to the USDA Economic Research Service (ERS), the price difference between Mexico City feeders and imported 500 to 600 pound feeder cattle has also continued to widen. To obtain the import report, visit the LGMN website at http://www.ams.usda.gov/LSMarketNews.

Recently, CanFax released Canada’s current cattle on feed numbers for terminal feedlots with 1,000 or more head in the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan. According to the data, on July 1, 2012, Canada’s cattle on feed totaled 746,882 head. This was 7.1 percent lower than one year ago and was 5.2 percent lower than two years ago. This is the smallest on record since the series began in 2000. Cattle placed on feed during June equaled 65,797 head. This was down slightly from one year ago and was down 1.7 percent from two years ago. Steers placed on feed totaled 40,469 head, which comprised 61.5 percent of the total. Heifers placed on feed totaled 25,328 head. More specifically, placements of feeder cattle weighing less than 600 pounds equaled 2,474 head, which was 8.6 percent less than last year. Placements of feeders weighing 600 to 699 pounds totaled 928 head, 60.9 percent lower than a year ago. Placements of feeder cattle weighing 700 to 799 pounds declined 25.7 percent from last year to 5,508 head. Feeder cattle placements weighing more than 800 pounds totaled 56,887 head, which was up 5.6 percent over last year. In the meantime, Canada’s fed cattle marketings during May totaled 138,181 head. This was 14.1 percent less than one year ago and was 29.1 percent less than two years ago. To obtain the entire report, go to the CanFax website at http://www.canfax.ca/.

On July 16, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) announced that it was proposing mandatory pig traceability regulations. The purpose of the traceability system is to protect the health of people in Canada and the Canadian herd. It could also assist in the re-opening of markets should there be a disease outbreak. Mandatory identification systems are already in place in Canada for cattle, bison and sheep. For more information, visit the CFIA website at http://inspection.gc.ca/.

Pacific Rim

Recently, Japan’s Agriculture and Livestock Industries Corporation (ALIC) published Japan’s red meat import data for May 2012. According to the figures, during May, Japan imported 42,218 MT of beef. This was 13.4 percent more than April and was 5.0 percent more than May 2011. More specifically, imports of frozen beef equaled 23,226 MT, which was up 14.6 percent over the previous month and was up 1.1 percent over May 2011. Imports of fresh, chilled beef equaled 18,979 MT, which was up 12.5 percent over the previous month and was up 10.5 percent over May 2011. During May, Japan’s beef imports from Australia rose 6.9 percent over the previous month to 26,128 MT. This was slightly higher than May 2011. Year-to-date beef imports from Australia were down 8.8 percent from a year ago, amounting to 125,866 MT. Australia was the main beef import market for Japan with 64.9 percent of the total. Japan’s beef imports from the U.S. during May totaled 10,868 MT, which was 28.3 percent higher than the previous month and was 17.9 percent higher than May 2011. Additionally, this was the highest single month volume since September 2011. Total year-todate beef imports from the U.S. reached 44,657 MT, 6.7 percent greater than last year. Beef imports from New Zealand during May rose 30.7 percent over April and 9.1 percent over May 2011 to 3,317 MT. Total year-to-date beef imports from New Zealand were 7.2 percent lower than last year, amounting to 13,677 MT. Overall, Japan’s total year-to-date beef imports equaled 194,070 MT, 5.1 percent below the same period a year ago. Japan’s beef marketings during April totaled 71,234 MT, 4.1 percent less than the previous month and 14.0 percent less than last year. Marketings of imported beef were down 24.0 percent from last year, equaling 39,418 MT. Domestic beef marketings totaled 31,816 MT, which was 2.8 percent higher than last year. At the end of April, Japan’s beef stocks amounted to 76,842 MT, which was down 3.6 percent from the previous month and was down 6.1 percent from a year ago. Stocks of imported beef equaled 66,166 MT, 7.1 percent less than last year. Stocks of domestic beef totaled 10,676 MT, a little higher than a year ago.

During May, Japan imported 72,644 MT of pork. This was 35.6 percent more than the previous month and was 13.3 percent more than May 2011. More specifically, frozen pork imports totaled 50,577 MT, which was 60.8 percent higher than the previous month and was 12.4 percent higher than May 2011. Fresh, chilled pork imports totaled 22,062 MT, which was slightly lower than the previous month but was 15.4 percent higher than May 2011. Pork imports from the U.S. during May equaled 30,054 MT. This was up 20.1 percent over the previous month and was up 15.2 percent over May 2011. Year-to-date pork imports from the U.S. were 3.5 percent more than last year, amounting to 139,019 MT. The U.S. was the largest supplier of pork to Japan with 42.9 percent of the total imports. During May, Japan’s pork imports from Canada rose 30.6 percent over April and 30.3 percent over May 2011 to 14,635 MT. Total year-to-date pork imports from Canada equaled 68,477 MT, 1.5 percent lower than last year. Japan’s pork imports from Denmark during May totaled 12,428 MT, 84.3 percent greater than the previous month and 8.7 percent greater than May 2011. Also, this was the highest single month volume since August 2010. Year-todate pork imports from Denmark totaled 48,746 MT, 5.6 percent less than a year ago. Overall, Japan’s total year-todate pork imports equaled 324,176 MT, a little more than the same period a year ago. Japan’s pork marketings during April fell 7.6 percent from the previous month and 8.7 percent from a year ago to 133,155 MT. Imported pork marketings totaled 57,801 MT, which was 20.3 percent less than last year. Marketings of domestic pork imports were up 2.8 percent over a year ago, equaling 75,354 MT. At the end of April, Japan’s pork stocks totaled 178,148 MT, which was down 2.6 percent from the previous month but was up 2.8 percent over a year ago. Stocks of imported pork totaled 157,308 MT, 6.6 percent greater than a year ago. Stocks of domestic pork equaled 20,840 MT, 19.0 percent lower than a year ago. Additional data on Japan’s red meat trade can be found on the ALIC website at http://lin.alic.go.jp/alic/statis/dome/data2/e_nstatis.htm.

July 2012

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