TheMeatSite.com - TheMeatSite.com - news, features and articles for the meat processing industry

USDA International Meat Review


25 April 2014

USDA International Meat Review - 25 April 2014USDA International Meat Review - 25 April 2014


USDA International Meat Review

Trade Highlights

The USDA Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) recently issued its bi-annual report, Livestock and Poultry: World Markets and Trade. According to the publication, world beef and veal production during 2014 is forecast at a record 58.86 MMT. This was up slightly over 2013. U.S. beef production during 2014 is predicted to total 11.23 MMT, which is 4.5 percent less than 2013. This is the lowest level in 20 years. The U.S. is the leading beef production nation. During 2014, beef production in Brazil, the second largest beef producing country, is forecast to reach 9.92 MMT. This is 2.5 percent less than 2013. Beef production in the EU is expected to increase 1.5 percent over 2013 to 7.58 MMT. During 2014, world beef and veal exports are forecast to increase 3.8 percent over 2013 to 9.51 MMT. During 2014, beef exports from Brazil are expected to increase 9.8 percent over 2013 to 2.03 MMT. Brazil is the leading beef exporting country. India’s beef exports are forecast to total a record 1.88 MMT, 6.2 percent more than 2013. Australia’s beef exports during 2014 are expected to fall 2.1 percent from 2013 to 1.56 MMT. U.S. beef exports during 2014 are forecast at 1.14 MMT, which is down 2.6 percent from 2013. During 2014, world beef and veal imports are forecast to total 7.76 MMT, which is up 4.5 percent over 2013. The U.S. is predicted to be the largest beef importing country in 2014 with 1.06 MMT, which is 3.3 percent greater than 2013 due to tight supplies and strong demand for processing beef. Russia’s beef imports during 2014 are expected to fall 1.1 percent from 2013 to 1.02 MMT. Japan’s beef imports are expected total 760,000 MT, which is unchanged from 2013, driven by tight Australian and U.S. supplies. During 2014, China’s beef imports are predicted to increase 33.5 percent over 2013 to a record 550,000 MT. The increase is due to rising consumer demand and competitive prices. Meanwhile, FAS forecasts world pork production during 2014 to total a record 110.70 MMT. This is 1.1 percent above 2013. Swine disease outbreaks are major forecast movers. Porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) has affected production estimates in North American, Asian and South American countries. This has, in turn, affected demand and supplies for export. China’s pork production during 2014 is expected to reach a record 56.95 MMT, which is 2.4 percent greater than 2013 because of fewer swine disease outbreaks and better animal nutrition and genetics. China is the primary pork producing nation. During 2014, pork production in the EU, which is the second largest pork producing country, is forecast to total 22.30 MMT. This is slightly lower than 2013. Pork production in the U.S. during 2014 is predicted to total 10.33 MMT, which is down 1.9 percent from 2013, due to PED. During 2014, world pork exports are forecast at 6.86 MMT, which is 2.3 percent lower than 2013. U.S. pork exports during 2014 are predicted to fall 2.8 percent from 2013 to 2.20 MMT as tight supplies and record high prices are affecting U.S. competitiveness. The U.S. is the largest pork exporting country. EU pork exports are forecast to 2.00 MMT during 2014, which is 10.4 percent less than 2013 due to the loss of their top market, Russia. During 2014, Canada’s pork exports are expected to increase 1.5 percent over 2013 to 1.27 MMT. World pork imports during 2014 are forecast to total 6.59 MMT, which is down 1.0 percent from 2013. Japan’s pork imports are predicted to increase slightly over 2013 to 1.23 MMT. Japan is the main pork importing nation. During 2014, China is expected to import 790,000 MT of pork, which is up 2.6 percent over 2013. Russia’s pork imports during 2014 are forecast to decrease 25.1 percent from 2013 to 650,000 head. This is the lowest level in 10 years due to restrictions on product from the EU. Pork imports from the U.S. are forecast at 415,000 MT, 4.0 percent higher than 2013. The entire report is available on the FAS website at http://www.fas.usda.gov/psdonline/circulars/livestock_poultry.pdf

On April 16, USDA Secretary Vilsack announced that the USDA and the FAS awarded funding to more than 60 U.S. agricultural organizations to help expand commercial export markets. The funding was made available through the 2014 Farm Bill. Through the Market and Access Program (MAP), FAS will provide $171.8 million to 62 nonprofit organizations and cooperatives. Through the Foreign Market Development (FMD) Program, FAS will allocate $24.6 million to 22 trade organizations. To view the press release and a complete listing of the funding allocations, as well as descriptions on each program, visit the FAS website at http://www.fas.usda.gov/.

North America

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), which is a division of the Department of Homeland Security, recently published the most current statistics on U.S. beef imports under a tariff rate quota (TRQ). According to the data, as of April 14, 2014, U.S. beef imports under a TRQ totaled 194,715 MT. This was nearly 1.0 percent more than the same period a year ago. Imports of beef from New Zealand were 7.2 percent less than a year ago, amounting to 51,785 MT. This filled 24.3 percent of the country’s TRQ, down from 26.1 percent the previous year. Beef imports from Australia totaled 50,412 MT. This was 10.5 percent more than a year ago. This filled 13.3 percent of the TRQ, compared to 12.1 percent a year ago. Beef imports from Canada, which are not subject to a TRQ, equaled 49,263 MT, which was 9.2 percent above a year ago. Beef imports from Mexico, which also do not fall under a TRQ, totaled 25,489 MT, 1.0 percent higher than last year. Through April 14, beef imports from Uruguay were 45.1 percent lower than last year, equaling 4,052 MT. Uruguay filled 20.3 percent of its TRQ, which was down from 36.9 percent last year. The weekly report is available on the CBP website at http://www.cbp.gov/trade/quota/commodity-graph-report

CanFax recently published Canada’s current cattle on feed numbers for terminal feedlots with 1,000 or more head in the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan. According to the data, Canada’s total cattle on feed on April 1, 2014 equaled 984,112 head. This was 8.0 percent more than one year ago and was 1.2 percent more than the five year average. During March, the number of cattle placed on feed declined 9.2 percent from a year ago to 160,288 head. Also, this was 16.1 percent lower than the five year average. Steers placed on feed totaled 111,178 head, which comprised 69.4 percent of the total. Heifers placed on feed totaled 49,110 head. More specifically, placements of feeder cattle weighing less than 600 pounds equaled 11,507 head, which was 23.9 percent less than last year. Placements weighing 600 to 699 pounds totaled 24,843 head, 3.9 percent higher than a year ago. Placements weighing 700 to 799 pounds were down 5.5 percent from last year, amounting to 42,178 head. Finally, placements of feeder cattle weighing more than 800 pounds totaled 81,760 head, which was 12.0 percent lower than a year ago. Meanwhile, during March, Canada’s fed cattle marketings rose 11.8 percent over one year ago to 144,488 head. This was nearly 1.0 percent less than the five year average. To view the entire report, visit the CanFax website at http://www.canfax.ca/.

On April 22, the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) released its monthly Cold Storage report. According to the report, as of March 31, 2014, beef in U.S. cold storage facilities equaled 404.8 million pounds. This was 20.8 percent lower than a year ago and was 10.9 percent lower than the five year average. Specifically, boneless beef in cold storage fell 20.8 percent from a year ago to 363.8 million pounds. Beef cuts in storage totaled 41.0 million pounds, which was 21.0 percent less than last year. In the meantime, at the end of March, pork in U.S. cold storage totaled 575.2 million pounds. This was 11.2 percent less than a year ago and was 2.2 percent less than the five year average. Specifically, hams in storage equaled 89.6 million pounds, 5.2 percent less than last year. The volume of pork bellies in storage rose 54.9 percent over a year ago to 79.7 million pounds. Loins in cold storage totaled 41.5 million pounds, 3.5 percent lower than last year. Pork ribs in storage equaled 120.3 million pounds, 1.7 percent less than a year ago. The volume of pork butts in storage declined 18.2 percent from last year to 20.0 million pounds. Pork trimmings in storage equaled 36.9 million pounds, which was 44.2 percent lower than a year ago. The volume of veal in U.S. cold storage was down 49.5 percent from a year ago, totaling 2.9 million pounds. Lamb and mutton in cold storage equaled 28.1 million pounds, which was 59.3 percent higher than last year. To obtain the complete report, visit the NASS website at http://www.nass.usda.gov/.

Pacific Rim

Japan’s Agriculture and Livestock Industries Corporation (ALIC) recently issued Japan’s red meat import data for February 2014. According to the data, Japan’s beef imports during February rose 6.3 percent over the previous month and 16.4 percent over February 2013 to 35,798 MT. Specifically, frozen beef imports equaled 20,940 MT, which was up 8.4 percent over the previous month and was up 25.8 percent over February 2013. Fresh, chilled beef imports equaled 14,809 MT, which was up 3.7 percent over the previous month and was up 5.2 percent over February 2013. Beef imports from Australia during February totaled 19,679 MT. This was 9.0 percent more than January and was 8.5 percent more than February 2013. Year-to-date beef imports from Australia were 4.8 percent below last year, totaling 37,733 MT. Australia was the leading provider of beef to Japan with 54.3 percent of that total imports. During February, Japan imported 12,679 MT of beef from the U.S. This was slightly higher than the previous month and was 60.0 percent higher than February 2013. Total year-to-date beef imports from the U.S. equaled 25,289 MT, 60.4 percent greater than a year ago. Japan’s beef imports from New Zealand during February rose 23.5 percent over the previous month to 2,341 MT. However, this was 6.7 percent less than February 2013. Year-to-date beef imports from New Zealand were down 12.9 percent from last year, amounting to 4,237 MT. Overall, Japan’s total year-to-date beef imports equaled 69,463 MT, which was 6.5 percent above the same period a year ago. Japan’s beef marketings during January totaled 62,600 MT, which was 24.3 percent less than the previous month and was 5.0 percent less than a year ago. Marketings of imported beef were down 7.4 percent from last year, equaling 35,558 MT. Domestic beef marketings totaled 27,042 MT, which was 1.7 percent lower than a year ago. At the end of January, Japan’s beef stocks totaled 118,811 MT. This was down 2.5 percent from the previous month but was up 29.1 percent over a year ago. Stocks of imported beef equaled 106,550 MT, 34.6 percent more than last year. Stocks of domestic beef were down 4.6 percent from a year ago, amounting to 12,261 MT.

Japan’s pork imports during February fell 14.3 percent from January and fell 1.4 percent from February 2013 to 57,157 MT. More specifically, frozen pork imports totaled 31,141 MT, which was down 24.4 percent from the previous month and was down 16.5 percent from February 2013. Conversely, fresh, chilled pork imports were up 2.0 percent over the previous month and were up 25.9 percent over February 2013, totaling 26,016 MT. Japan’s pork imports from the U.S. during February equaled 21,495 MT. This was 1.7 percent less than the previous month and was 3.6 percent less than February 2013. Total year-to-date pork imports from the U.S. were 7.8 percent below last year, amounting to 43,369 MT. The U.S. was the largest supplier of pork to Japan with 35.0 percent of the total imports. During February, Japan imported 12,268 MT of pork from Canada. This was up 4.5 percent over the previous month and was up 1.8 percent over February 2013. Year-to-date pork imports from Canada totaled 24,013 MT, 2.6 percent higher than a year ago. Pork imports from Denmark during February fell 39.2 percent from the previous month to 7,994 MT. Also, this was down 9.0 percent from February 2013. Year-to-date pork imports from Denmark were 9.0 percent higher than last year, totaling 21,151 MT. Overall, Japan’s total year-to-date pork imports equaled 123,866 MT, 3.3 percent greater than the corresponding period a year ago. Japan’s pork marketings during January fell 11.0 percent from the previous month to 133,283 MT. However, this was up 1.8 percent over a year ago. Imported pork marketings totaled 51,352 MT, which was 1.2 percent higher than a year ago. Marketings of domestic pork were 2.2 percent higher than last year, totaling 81,932 MT. At the end of January, Japan’s pork stocks totaled 164,112 MT, which was 9.3 percent higher than the previous month but was 6.4 percent lower than a year ago. Stocks of imported pork equaled 143,601 MT, 7.0 percent less than last year. Stocks of domestic pork equaled 20,511 MT, which was 1.7 percent below a year ago. Additional data on Japan’s red meat trade can be found on the ALIC website at http://lin.alic.go.jp/alic/statis/dome/data2/e_nstatis.htm.

Recently, the Korea International Trade Association (KITA) published South Korea’s beef and pork import data for March 2014. According to the statistics, during March, South Korea imported 23,159 MT of beef. This was up 18.7 percent over the previous month and was up 21.5 percent over March 2013. More specifically, imports of frozen product totaled 19,512 MT, which accounted for 84.3 percent of the total. Imports of fresh, chilled product totaled 3,647 MT, of which Australia’s share was 77.6 percent. South Korea’s beef imports from Australia during March totaled 13,304 MT, which was 28.8 percent more than the previous month and was 27.3 percent more than March 2013. During the first quarter of the year, South Korea’s beef imports from Australia equaled 37,788 MT, which was 9.2 percent greater than last year. Australia was the primary beef import market for South Korea with 53.2 percent of the total. During March, South Korea imported 7,660 MT of beef from the U.S. This was 8.1 percent higher than the previous month and was 29.0 percent higher March 2013. Year-to-date beef imports from the U.S. totaled 26,758 MT, which was 6.3 percent more than a year ago. Beef imports from New Zealand during March rose 1.5 percent over the previous month to 1,992 MT. However, this was down 19.8 percent from March 2013. Total year-to-date beef imports from New Zealand equaled 5,856 MT, 22.7 percent less than a year ago. Overall, South Korea’s beef imports during the first quarter of 2014 totaled 70,986 MT, which was 4.2 percent higher than the same period a year ago. Meanwhile, during March, South Korea imported 29,690 MT of pork, which was up 5.5 percent over February and was up 18.9 percent over March 2013. Pork imports from the U.S. during March fell 6.6 percent from the previous month and 8.4 percent from March 2013 to 9,828 MT. During the first quarter, South Korea’s pork imports from the U.S. were 10.4 percent below a year ago, amounting to 31,421 MT. The U.S. was the leading supplier of pork to South Korea with 36.7 percent of the total. Pork imports from Germany during March rose 28.0 percent over the previous month and 113.6 percent over March 2013 to 4,562 MT. Year-to-date pork imports from Germany equaled 11,509 MT, which was 57.3 percent greater than last year. During March, South Korea imported 3,103 MT of pork from Canada. This was down 5.1 percent from February and was down 6.4 percent from March 2013. During the first quarter, pork imports from Canada were 10.3 percent above a year ago, totaling 8,811 MT. Overall, South Korea’s total pork imports during the first quarter of 2014 totaled 85,611 MT, which was 2.2 percent above the corresponding period a year ago. Additional data on South Korea’s trade can be found on the KITA website at http://www.kita.org/.

DOWNLOAD REPORT:- Download this report here

Share This


Related Reports

Reports By Country

Reports By Category

Our Sponsors

Partners