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USDA International Meat Review


31 March 2014

USDA International Meat Review - 27 March 2014USDA International Meat Review - 27 March 2014


USDA International Meat Review

Trade Highlights

Recently, the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) released Livestock and Products Annual 2014 reports for the countries of Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, Russia and the Ukraine. The reports include summaries, outlooks, slaughter data, livestock inventories, trade situations, consumption statistics and current data on production and supply. Each report is available on the FAS Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN) at http://gain.fas.usda.gov/.

North America

CanFax recently published Canada’s 2014 feedlot demographic survey results. According to the report, as of January 1, 2014, the total number of feedlots in Alberta and Saskatchewan was 157, down from 172 a year ago. The total bunk capacity in the two provinces was 1,443,700 head, down 5.4 percent from 2013. According to CanFax, negative feeding margins during the first half of 2013 forced the closure of a few terminal lots, but the largest cause was the switch from finishing to backgrounding of cattle. Alberta saw a decrease in the total number of feedlots from 164 in 2013 to 151 in 2014. In Saskatchewan, there were six feedlots, compared to eight a year ago. Four out of the last five years have seen consolidation in the feedlot sector. Additionally, from 2008 to present, the total feedlot capacity in Alberta and Saskatchewan decline by 304,050 head, or 17.0 percent. For the complete report, go to the CanFax website at http://www.canfax.ca/.

CanFax recently published Canada’s current cattle on feed numbers for terminal feedlots with 1,000 or more head in the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan. According to the numbers, Canada’s total cattle on feed on March 1, 2014 equaled 980,675 head. This was 10.1 percent more than one year ago and was 3.0 percent more than the five year average. During February, the number of cattle placed on feed rose 12.6 percent over one year ago to 149,120 head. However, this was 14.1 percent less than the five year average. Steers placed on feed totaled 93,999 head, which accounted for 63.0 percent of the total. Heifers placed on feed totaled 55,121 head. More specifically, placements of feeder cattle weighing less than 600 pounds equaled 20,073 head, 32.5 percent more than last year. Placements weighing 600 to 699 pounds totaled 31,956 head, 20.0 percent higher than a year ago. Placements of feeder cattle weighing 700 to 799 pounds were down 18.5 percent from last year, totaling 33,486 head. Finally, placements of feeder cattle weighing more than 800 pounds equaled 63,605 head, 28.3 percent greater than last year. Meanwhile, Canada’s fed cattle marketings totaled 136,091 head, which was 6.1 percent higher than one year ago but was 1.1 percent lower than the five year average. To view the entire report, visit the CanFax website at http://www.canfax.ca/.

On March 21, the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) published its monthly Cattle on Feed report. According to the data, on March 1, 2014, cattle and calves on feed for the U.S. slaughter market for feedlots with a capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 10.79 million head. This was down a little from one year ago and was down 7.6 percent from two years ago. The number of cattle placed on feed during February rose 14.7 percent over one year ago to 1.65 million head. However, this was 3.7 percent lower than two years ago. Placements of feeder cattle in each weight category increased over a year ago. More specifically, placements weighing less than 600 pounds totaled 390,000 head, which was 13.0 percent higher than a year ago. Placements of feeder cattle weighing 600 to 699 pounds totaled 330,000 head, 29.4 percent above last year. Placements weighing 700 to 799 pounds were up 4.3 percent over last year, amounting to 415,000 head. Finally, placements of feeder cattle weighing more than 800 pounds equaled 515,000 head, which was 17.0 percent more than year ago. Meanwhile, during February, U.S. fed cattle marketings totaled 1.55 million head. This was down 3.4 percent from one year ago and was down 11.7 percent from two years ago. Also, this was the lowest February marketings since the series began in 1996. The complete report is available on the NASS website at http://www.nass.usda.gov/.

On March 21, USDA NASS released its monthly Cold Storage report. According to the report, as of February 28, 2014, beef in U.S. cold storage facilities equaled 407.1 million pounds. This was 16.9 percent less than last year and was 9.9 percent less than the five year average. More specifically, boneless beef in cold storage totaled 364.0 million pounds, which was 16.0 percent lower than a year ago. Beef cuts in cold storage equaled 43.1 million pounds, 24.0 percent less than last year. Meanwhile at the end of February, 653.8 million pounds of pork was in U.S. cold storage. This was up 3.2 percent over the previous year and was up 10.0 percent over the five year average. Specifically, the volume of hams in storage equaled 117.2 million pounds, which was 5.8 percent higher than a year ago. The volume of pork bellies in storage was 105.4 percent above last year, totaling 88.3 million pounds. Pork loins in storage equaled 43.7 million pounds, 3.3 percent more than a year ago. The volume of ribs in storage was up 2.7 percent over a year ago, amounting to 122.6 million pounds. Pork butts in cold storage totaled 26.0 million pounds, which was 9.5 percent lower than last year. Pork trimmings in storage totaled 37.8 million pounds, which was down 41.3 percent from a year ago. The volume of pork variety meats in cold storage was up 11.7 percent over last year, totaling 36.4 million pounds. Veal in U.S. cold storage equaled 3.2 million pounds, 34.3 percent lower than last year. Lamb and mutton in cold storage totaled 26.3 million pounds, which was 32.4 percent more than a year ago. To obtain the entire report, go to the NASS website at http://www.nass.usda.gov/.

Pacific Rim

The Korea International Trade Association (KITA) recently released February 2014 beef and pork import data for South Korea. According to the numbers, South Korea’s beef imports during February equaled 19,507 MT, which was down 31.1 percent from January but was up 8.2 percent over February 2013. More specifically, imports of frozen beef equaled 17,031 MT, which accounted for 87.3 percent of the total. Fresh, chilled beef imports equaled 2,476 MT. During February, South Korea imported 10,331 MT of beef from Australia. Although this was 27.0 percent lower than the previous month, it was 12.8 percent higher than February 2013. Total year-to-date beef imports from Australia were 1.4 percent more than a year ago, amounting to 24,484 MT. Australia was the main beef import market for South Korea with 51.2 percent of the total imports. South Korea’s beef imports from the U.S. during February fell 41.0 percent from the previous month to 7,086 MT. However, this was 9.9 percent greater than February 2013. Year-to-date beef imports from the U.S. totaled 19,098 MT, a little less than a year ago. The U.S. was the second largest source for South Korea’s beef imports with 39.9 percent of the total. During February, South Korea imported 1,962 MT of beef from New Zealand. This was up 3.1 percent over the previous month but was down 9.9 percent from February 2013. Year-todate beef imports from New Zealand equaled 3,865 MT, which was 24.1 percent lower than last year. Overall, South Korea’s total year-to-date beef imports equaled 47,827 MT, which was 2.5 percent below the same period a year ago. Meanwhile, during February, South Korea imported 28,140 MT of pork. This was 1.3 percent more than the previous month and was 14.8 percent more than February 2013. Pork imports from the U.S. during February fell 5.0 percent from January to 10,522 MT. However, this was up 17.2 percent over February 2013. Total year-todate pork imports from the U.S. equaled 21,594 MT, which was 11.3 percent lower than a year ago. The U.S. was the main supplier of pork to South Korea with 38.6 percent of the total imports. During February, South Korea imported 3,270 MT of pork from Canada. Although this was 34.1 percent higher than the previous month, it was 12.5 percent lower than February 2013. Year-to-date pork imports from Canada totaled 5,708 MT, which was 23.3 percent below a year ago. South Korea’s pork imports from Chile during February equaled 1,859 MT. This was down 25.4 percent from the previous month and was down 37.6 percent from February 2013. Year-to-date pork imports from Chile were 27.1 percent less than a year ago, amounting to 4,652 MT. Overall, South Korea’s total year-to-date pork imports equaled 55,921 MT, which was 4.9 percent less than the corresponding period a year ago. To obtain further data on South Korea’s trade, go to the KITA website at http://www.kita.org/.

Recently, Japan’s Agriculture and Livestock Industries Corporation (ALIC) published Japan’s beef and pork import data for January 2014. According to the data, during January, Japan imported 33,665 MT of beef. This was 13.5 percent lower than the previous month and was 2.3 percent lower than a year ago. More specifically, imports of frozen beef totaled 19,315 MT, which was up 1.0 percent over the previous month but was down 5.9 percent from a year ago. Conversely, imports of fresh, chilled beef totaled 14,275 MT, which was down 27.6 percent from the previous month but was up 2.9 percent over a year ago. During January, Japan’s beef imports from Australia fell 22.4 percent from the previous month and 16.0 percent from a year ago to 18,054 MT. Australia was the primary source for Japan’s beef imports with 53.6 percent of the total. Japan’s beef imports from the U.S. during January equaled 12,610 MT. This was up 5.6 percent over the previous month and was up 60.7 percent over a year ago. Beef imports from New Zealand during January totaled 1,896 MT, which was 11.0 percent less than the previous month and was 19.4 percent less than a year ago. During December, Japan’s beef marketings totaled 82,707 MT, which was down 4.6 percent from the previous month but was up 1.4 percent over a year ago. More specifically, marketings of imports beef equaled 47,214 MT, 7.6 percent more than a year ago. Marketings of domestic beef equaled 35,493 MT, 5.8 percent less than a year ago. At the end of December, Japan’s beef stocks totaled 121,812 MT. This was 7.1 percent lower than the previous month but was 25.9 higher than a year ago. Stocks of imported beef were 30.5 percent greater than a year ago, amounting to 108,443 MT. Domestic beef stocks totaled 13,369 MT, which was 2.2 percent less than a year ago.

During January, Japan imported 66,709 MT of pork. This was 5.9 percent higher than the previous month and was 7.6 percent higher than a year ago. More specifically, frozen pork imports equaled 41,210 MT, which was up 15.1 percent over the previous month and was up 2.7 percent over a year ago. Fresh, chilled pork imports equaled 25,499 MT, which was down 6.2 percent from the previous month but was up 16.7 percent over a year ago. During January, Japan’s pork imports from the U.S. equaled 21,874 MT. This was 9.3 percent less than the previous month and was 11.5 percent less than a year ago. The U.S. was the leading provider of pork to Japan with 32.8 percent of the total. Pork imports from Canada during January fell 8.0 percent from the previous month to 11,745 MT. However, this was 3.5 percent higher than last year. During January, Japan imported 13,157 MT of pork from Denmark, which was up 46.1 percent over the previous month and was up 23.8 percent over a year ago. During December, Japan’s marketings of pork totaled 149,715 MT. This was down 1.4 percent from the previous month and was down 2.4 percent from a year ago. Marketings of imported pork were 7.5 percent lower than a year ago, amounting to 66,723 MT. Marketings of domestic pork equaled 82,993 MT, which was 2.0 percent higher than a year ago. Pork stocks at the end of December totaled 150,210 MT. This was down 1.8 percent from the previous month and was down 8.7 percent from a year ago. Imported pork stocks totaled 128,244 MT, which was 10.4 percent less than a year ago. Domestic pork stocks were 2.8 percent higher than a year ago, amounting to 21,966 MT. To obtain additional data, visit the ALIC website at http://lin.alic.go.jp/alic/statis/dome/data2/e_nstatis.htm.

Oceania

Recently, the Australian Lot Feeders’ Association (ALFA) and Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA) published the results of Australia’s fourth quarter cattle on feed survey. According to the numbers, as of December 31, 2013, Australia’s cattle on feed totaled 810,405 head. This was up 2.9 percent over the previous quarter and was up 2.3 percent over a year ago. The majority of Australia’s cattle on feed were located in the state of Queensland, which had 476,033 head of cattle on feed. This accounted for 58.7 percent of the total. This was down 5.6 percent from the previous quarter. Combined, Queensland and New South Wales had 721,262 head, or 89.0 percent of the total. In the fourth quarter, Australia’s feedlot capacity equaled 1,136,842 head. This was 2.2 percent less than the previous quarter and was 10.9 percent less than a year ago. Queensland was the state with the largest feedlot capacity with 589,005 head, which comprised 51.8 percent of the total capacity. Combined, Queensland and New South Wales had a feedlot capacity of 957,109 head, 84.2 percent of the total. During the fourth quarter, Australia’s cattle marketings totaled 616,473 head, which was down 12.9 percent from the previous quarter and was down 9.9 percent from a year ago. Total marketings during 2013 equaled 2,622,990 head, which was 4.7 percent more than 2012 and was 7.3 percent more than 2011. The entire report can be found on the ALFA website at http://www.feedlots.com.au/.

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